Sportsmetrics Achieves National Recognition in Premier Journal

Sportsmetrics was recently recognized in a major publication for its efforts in ACL injury prevention. In the April 3rd issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Postma and West reviewed ACL injury prevention programs from the past 2 decades, as well as risk factors, clinical studies, screening and compliance.

Our 1999 Sportsmetrics study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine was sited as the first prospective, non-randomized clinical study sho

wing the protective effects of a neuromuscular training program. The JBJS publication pointed out that the untrained female athletes in our study had a significantly increased incidence of injury when compared to the Sportsmetrics-trained female group and untrained males.

The article concludes that a good ACL injury prevention program should incorporate feedback on technique, be performed throughout the year, and focus on flexibility, strengthening, and plyometrics.

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Eating on the Run: How To Eat Healthy While Traveling

Many folks think training for a marathon is a green light to eat whatever they want, but this could not be further from the truth. Nutrition is a key component of any training regimen and especially for endurance training. In fact, it is just as important as getting in that interval workout, long run, or strength routine. If you are eating the wrong foods and not getting enough of the right ones, you won’t be 100% prepared come race day. And it could mean the difference between finishing the race and not.

Throughout your training, it’s important to make sure you are eating a balanced diet. This is not the time to try out that fad diet you’ve been hearing so much about. Low-Carb isn’t going to get it done when you’re pounding the pavement. Carbohydrate is your primary source of energy; too little carb will cause muscles to fatigue quicker. Protein and fat also play major roles in your training regimen. Protein helps build and maintain muscle and is needed for muscle recover.

Fat is another big source of energy especially in low intensity, long duration activities such as marathons. It’s best to balance your training diet with 50-60% of calories coming from carbohydrates, 10-20% from protein and no more than 30% from fat with most of your fat sources coming from unsaturated fats (think nuts, olive oil, avocados.)

The first step to an optimal training diet is limiting or eliminating the high-fat, processed and high sugar foods that we all love. Try eliminating trips to the drive-thru, fried food, processed foods (frozen, canned and processed meats) and low quality carbs (desserts, candies and bakery goods). These are going to make you feel sluggish and will not provide you with the greatest amount of energy for your workout. Second, you want to replace those foods with fresh fruits and vegetables,

whole grains, fresh lean meats and low fat dairy products. See list of healthy food sources.

Before a big workout or the race, you want to choose a meal low in fat and fiber for easy digestion about 3-4 hours before the event. It should consist of mainly carbohydrates with a small amount of protein to aid in recovery. The most important part about a pre-exercise meal is to go with what is familiar, something you have tried before that you know will not upset your stomach. Never try something new before the big race or even a long run. If it agrees with you, go with it. Click here for pre-exercise meal ideas from eatright.org.

Immediately following your workout or race, your body is depleted of glycogen and needs to be replenished. As hard as it may be, try to get some carbs and a small amount of protein into your body within 30 minutes of completing a workout. Many athletes find it easier to get a smoothie down rather than solids. Some athletes even swear by chocolate milk. Click here for post-exercise meal ideas from eatright.org.

And of course, do not forget to stay hydrated before, during and after a run or race. Hydration is just as important as eating the key nutrients and is the single largest contributor to fatigue. Click here for proper hydration guidelines from eatrigh.org .

Just think of nutrition as one of your essential workouts each week. If you want to ensure that you make it across that finish line, eat well, hydrate often, train hard, and of course… have fun!

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NEW WIPP POSTER AVAILABLE

WIPP is a specially designed ACL injury prevention warm-up, incorporating the four components of Sportsmetrics™ for maximum efficiency and conditioning. It can be used as a maintenance program following the formal Sportsmetrics™ 6-week training program or can be used at any time throughout an athlete’s season when unable to implement the formal Sportsmetrics™ program.

Download WIPP and start training today!

 

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Ursuline Volleyball Takes Back State Title

Congratulations to our Sportsmetrics-trained Ursuline Academy Lions for winning their 5th Volleyball State Title!  Ursuline defeated Massillon Jackson at Wright State University’s Nutter Center in straight sets Saturday, Nov. 10 for the school’s fifth volleyball state title.

The Lions finished their extraordinary season with a 23-6 record and national ranking of 22.  They held previous state titles in 1975, 1993, 2002, and 2009 as well as state runners up in 1995, 2001, 2003 and 2008.

We have proudly trained the Ursuline Volleyball team for the last 5 years and see what makes the team so special, their hard work and committment to every aspect of the sport.  We congratulate the Lions and thank coach Jeni

Case for allowing Sportsmetrics to be a part of her preseason conditioning.

 

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Sportsmetrics October Course

Cincinnati SportsMedicine Research and Education Foundation held the final Sportsmetrics Certification course of the year on October 13th and 14th for what turned out to be a beautiful fall weekend in Cincinnati. We welcomed many familiar faces to the course: 2 former PT students, 1 current PT student, 1 current fellow and 2 of our newest PT’s. The class of 21 came from a diverse range of backgrounds including PTs, ATCs, exercise physiologists, a coach and a chiropractor and traveled from as far as Covington, WA and Greeley, CO. Our new members spent the day learning the background and facts behind ACL injuries and injury prevention then spent the evening enjoying the Cincinnati night life…so we hear. We welcome our newest certified instructors to our family of dedicated professionals and we hope to see more of you at our next course!

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Montgomery County soccer players undergo ACL injury prevention training

With girls suffering more knee injuries than boys, some are focusing on workouts to reduce them

by Jennifer Beekman, Staff writer, Gazette.net

Wednes

day, August 01, 2012

According to recent studies conducted by the Cincinnati SportsMedicine Research and Education Foundation, the ACL injury rate is 2 to 10 times higher in females than in males.

One in 100 female high school athletes will tear her ACL, and one in 10 women in college athletics will suffer the injury, which involves a ligament in the center of the knee.

Intent on earning a spot in the starting lineup at NCAA Division I Cornell (N.Y.) University, where she is committed to play soccer this fall, Cantor set out to get herself as physically fit as possible in order to match up against more seasoned college athletes.

A big part of that, the Bulldogs two-year leading scorer said, is matching the physicality of bigger, faster and stronger opponents.

Enter Montgomery County-based physical therapists Stacy King and Marcie Schwartz.

The two recently became Sportsmetrics certified and were looking to help young female athletes in the prevention of ACL injuries.

Sportsmetrics, the first ACL injury prevention program that is scientifically proven, was created by a team of athletic trainers, physical therapists and researchers under the direction of Dr. Frank Noyes at Cincinnati SportsMedicine, according to the program’s website.

“You start looking around and seeing what’s in front of you, all these young kids with knee injuries,” King said. “Jenna was worried about the packet she got from Cornell for summer workout and that she wasn’t going to be fit. Her dad came to me and I thought this would be a really good thing to teach her. I was treating [rising Churchill sophomore midfielder] Kate Reese [who tore her right ACL in January] and two other girls.”

Seven county soccer players, including Cantor, Reese and recent Poolseville graduate Ali Nesselt have participated in the six-week, 18-class session.

King and Schwartz are scheduled to run another session in November and hope to continue to expand their program.

The premise of the program, King said, is ACL prevention. But it is broken down into components that are vital to every athlete.

Each class starts with a dynamic warmup to get the muscles ready, followed by agility training, cardiovascular workout, plyometrics (jump training) and then finishes with flexibility and stretching.

Through everything King and Schwartz enforce proper technique and form.

So much as a wrong step could result in an ACL tear, Schwartz said, adding that 70 percent of ACL tears do not result from contact.

One main reasons females are more prone to ACL tears, King said, is that they don’t tend to use their quadriceps muscles and hamstrings co-contractively. In other words, they don’t stay low enough.

King and Schwartz correct every wrong move, and the repetition over time forms a neuromuscular memory allowing athletes’ bodies to learn things such as not to cave in the knees toward each other, the proper alignment and to stay low.

Though Sportsmetrics is for injury prevention, athletes’ overall strength and fitness is enhanced through the rigorous and progressive program.

“I see muscles I’ve never seen before,” Nesselt said. “I feel like I’ve gotten so much faster. And just kicking the ball around, I just feel so much stronger.”

Cantor said the training has allowed her to perform riskier moves with the soccer ball at her feet, more cuts and pivots, that surely will help her at the next level.

King said there is a 75 percent carryover, neuromuscularly, so in game situations the proper form is instinctive.

Sportsmetrics is not just for soccer players. The general principles of the program can be tailored to athletes in all sports.

With athletes being forced to specialize in sports so early, Schwartz and King said they’ve seen an influx of injuries among young children, in particular knee ligament injuries.

The minimum age for participation in the program is 12, and they said they hope one day the program is a part of every youth organization, to help build a foundation based on proper technique.

“[An ACL tear] is a huge setback. You have to learn to do everything over again. A lot of tearing your ACL is the mental aspect. People say you’re never the same person and that’s probably true, you’re scared to plant. But everything I’ve done here has given me confidence in my knee. I can tell that everything has gotten stronger.”

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With girls suffering more knee injuries than boys, some are focusing on workouts to reduce them
by Jennifer Beekman, Staff writer, Gazette.net
Wednesday, August 01, 2012
Recent Winston Churchill High School graduate Jenna Cantor said a female athlete’s biggest fear is an anterior cruciate ligament tear.
According to recent studies conducted by the Cincinnati SportsMedicine Research and Education Foundation, the ACL injury rate is 2 to 10 times higher in females than in males.
One in 100 female high school athletes will tear her ACL, and one in 10 women in college athletics will suffer the injury, which involves a ligament in the center of the knee.
Intent on earning a spot in the starting lineup at NCAA Division I Cornell (N.Y.) University, where she is committed to play soccer this fall, Cantor set out to get herself as physically fit as possible in order to match up against more seasoned college athletes.
A big part of that, the Bulldogs two-year leading scorer said, is matching the physicality of bigger, faster and stronger opponents.
Enter Montgomery County-based physical therapists Stacy King and Marcie Schwartz.
The two recently became Sportsmetrics certified and were looking to help young female athletes in the prevention of ACL injuries.
Sportsmetrics, the first ACL injury prevention program that is scientifically proven, was created by a team of athletic trainers, physical therapists and researchers under the direction of Dr. Frank Noyes at Cincinnati SportsMedicine, according to the program’s website.
“You start looking around and seeing what’s in front of you, all these young kids with knee injuries,” King said. “Jenna was worried about the packet she got from Cornell for summer workout and that she wasn’t going to be fit. Her dad came to me and I thought this would be a really good thing to teach her. I was treating [rising Churchill sophomore midfielder] Kate Reese [who tore her right ACL in January] and two other girls.”
Seven county soccer players, including Cantor, Reese and recent Poolseville graduate Ali Nesselt have participated in the six-week, 18-class session.
King and Schwartz are scheduled to run another session in November and hope to continue to expand their program.
The premise of the program, King said, is ACL prevention. But it is broken down into components that are vital to every athlete.
Each class starts with a dynamic warmup to get the muscles ready, followed by agility training, cardiovascular workout, plyometrics (jump training) and then finishes with flexibility and stretching.
Through everything King and Schwartz enforce proper technique and form.
So much as a wrong step could result in an ACL tear, Schwartz said, adding that 70 percent of ACL tears do not result from contact.
One main reasons females are more prone to ACL tears, King said, is that they don’t tend to use their quadriceps muscles and hamstrings co-contractively. In other words, they don’t stay low enough.
King and Schwartz correct every wrong move, and the repetition over time forms a neuromuscular memory allowing athletes’ bodies to learn things such as not to cave in the knees toward each other, the proper alignment and to stay low.
Though Sportsmetrics is for injury prevention, athletes’ overall strength and fitness is enhanced through the rigorous and progressive program.
“I see muscles I’ve never seen before,” Nesselt said. “I feel like I’ve gotten so much faster. And just kicking the ball around, I just feel so much stronger.”

Cantor said the training has allowed her to perform riskier moves with the soccer ball at her feet, more cuts and pivots, that surely will help her at the next level.
King said there is a 75 percent carryover, neuromuscularly, so in game situations the proper form is instinctive.
Sportsmetrics is not just for soccer players. The general principles of the program can be tailored to athletes in all sports.
With athletes being forced to specialize in sports so early, Schwartz and King said they’ve seen an influx of injuries among young children, in particular knee ligament injuries.
The minimum age for participation in the program is 12, and they said they hope one day the program is a part of every youth organization, to help build a foundation based on proper technique.
“[An ACL tear] is a huge setback. You have to learn to do everything over again. A lot of tearing your ACL is the mental aspect. People say you’re never the same person and that’s probably true, you’re scared to plant. But everything I’ve done here has given me confidence in my knee. I can tell that everything has gotten stronger.”
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Weekly soccer warm-ups significantly reduced ACL injuries in girls

A neuromuscular warm-up program consisting of knee control and core stability exercises reduced ACL injury rates in female soccer players by up to 83%.

  •             Orthopaedics Today Europe, Issue 2

SAN FRANCISCO — Completing a 15-minute neuromuscular warm-up program twice a week during the competitive season led to significant reductions in ACL injuries in female soccer players aged 12 years to 17 years compared to a control group who completed their usual warm-up exercises during the same period, according to Swedish investigators.

After allowing for in season drop-outs, of the 309 soccer clubs in the two-armed parallel randomized study, final results were available for 121 clubs (2,479 players) in the interventional arm and 109 clubs (2,085 players) in the control arm.

“This makes our study the largest sports injury prevention trial in the world to date,” Markus Waldén, MD, PhD, of the Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, said.

Waldén, a co-lead investigator with Martin Hägglund, PT, PhD, presented results at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2012 Annual Meeting here.

During the 2009 competitive season, the interventional group completed a 15-minute neuromuscular warm-up program that was intended to replace the teams’ normal conventional warm-up exercises. It consisted of six knee control and core stability exercises — one-legged and two-legged knee squats, pelvic lifts, the bench, lunges and jump/landings — each with increased difficulty and involving paired exercises, according to Waldén.

“Nothing but the ball is needed, and the coaches were instructed to carry out the program twice weekly,” he said.

For the 96 acute knee injuries Waldén and colleagues recorded among participants, there were 21 ACL injuries. One-third of them occurred in the intervention group vs. two-thirds in the control group.

“A 15-minute neuromuscular warm-up program reduced the ACL injury rate by nearly two-thirds in adolescent female soccer [players]. Compliant players carrying out the program at least once per week had an even greater effect of the program,” Waldén said. “Our recommendation is neuromuscular training should be a part of the warm-up in female youth soccer.”

Investigators saw an 83% reduction in ACL injuries in compliant players when they accounted for age, menstrual history, match frequency and match play.

“As poor compliance might be a key factor in previous studies showing no effect, we tried to control this factor carefully by letting the coaches report the execution of the program in the attendance form and also by unannounced visits to the clubs,” Waldén said.

He told Orthopaedics Today Europe, “However, we did not specifically record whether the clubs carried out any other exercises as well and, in clubs having more than two weekly sessions, it is thus possible they carried out other exercises during these days that might enhance the effects of the program or counteract it, and this is a limitation of our study.” – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

  • Waldén M, Atroshi I, Magnusson H, Wagner P, Hägglund M. A randomized trial of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention in adolescent female soccer. Paper #95. Presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2012 Annual Meeting. Feb. 7-11. San Francisco.

For more information:

  • Markus Waldén, MD, PhD, can be reached at email: markus.walden@telia.com.
  • Disclosure: Waldén has no relevant financial disclosures.

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